For the one life we have
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What's On

Mon 24 June

Philosophy Group - The Mind-Body Problem. 7.30pm, in the Cross Keys, 34 Goodramgate, York, YO1 7LF.

Tues 2 July 2019Louise Haagh

Universal Basic Income with Dr Louise Haagh, University of York.

7.30pm to 9.00pm, in the Denham Room, Priory Street Centre, York YO1 6ET.

Can human beings claim a basic right to a dignified material existence, and could this be achieved through a Universal Basic Income?

Would UBI have the potential to supplement or replace the welfare state and to make economic life more democratic?

In This Changes Everything, Naomi Klein notes that the universal sense of basic income is that it could help to transform the way we treat our whole (social and physical) environment.

But is UBI possible and can it be financed?

Dr Louise Haagh is Reader in Politics at the University of York. She researches and writes about problems relating to the democratisation of human development, economic justice, modalities of institutional change, and social transformation. Louise is also known for her advocacy for a broader humanist, democratic defence of basic income that sets this reform in the context of a human development perspective on freedom and the problem of democratisation of the public sphere.

Louise has worked internationally with many academic institutions and governmental bodies. She is Chair of the Basic Income Earth Network (http://basicincome.org/) and her publications include her latest book (2019) The Case for Basic Income.

Mon 22 July

Philosophy Group - Punishment and its Aims. 7.30pm, in the Cross Keys, 34 Goodramgate, York, YO1 7LF.

Tues 6 August 2019Ian Hodgson

How to explain Humanism to a ten-year-old with Ian Hodgson.

7.30pm to 9.00pm, in the Denham Room, Priory Street Centre, York YO1 6ET.

The Religious Education Council of England and Wales recommends that Humanism be studied in schools as an example of a ‘non-religious worldview’.

The opportunity for children to learn about both religious and non-religious beliefs and values is essential if we are to foster social cohesion and respect for all. But this may not rank highly on the list of ‘really exciting and interesting stuff’ for most children. So the intention of Humanist school speakers is to motivate and encourage children to think for themselves as they develop their own ideas and view of the world.

School speakers from Humanists UK have recently completed their 1000th school visit. Well over 30,000 pupils have therefore had some introduction to humanist ideas since the programme began.

This talk will illustrate how some of the basic ideas in Humanism can made accessible to children and presented in an engaging and interesting way.

Ian Hodgson has taught in several Primary schools in Bradford and was the headteacher of a large inner-city Primary school. In recent years he established an education consultancy providing a range of services including interim headship, training, advice and support to schools and local authorities and was a Senior School Improvement Officer for North Lincolnshire Local Authority.

He has delivered school talks on Humanism since 2014 and sits as the Humanist representative on York's Standing Advisory Council on Religious Education (SACRE).

Wed 7 August

Book Group - Freakonomics: A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything, by Steven D. Levitt & Stephen J. Dubner. 8.00pm in The Black Swan, 23 Peasholme Green, York, YO1 7PR.

Tues 3 September 2019

Christianity versus Curiosity with Brian Gane.

“I look at the massive loss of Greek and Roman knowledge and literature around the year 400, largely as a result of Christian anti-reason, anti-curiosity attitudes as encouraged by Tertullian, Augustine, etc.

“This led to the Dark Ages, but by about 1600 science had recovered to the level of 400, despite continuing resistance from the churches, and in the following century took off in a big way, for instance with the founding of the Royal Society in 1660.

“In modern times I look at the different attitudes to knowledge and education among Jews, Moslems and the American fundamentalists in the Bible Belt. I identify the worrying damage that anti-curiosity attitudes in the US are causing, particularly in relation to global warming.

“My conclusion is that a strong case can be made that without Christianity we would have walked on the moon and cured cancer many centuries ago.”

Brian Gane retired from a career in local government, initially as a Chartered Surveyor/Planner and then in economic development. He has been interested in science since Sputnik 1 went up, including the history of science, and he did a degree in geology with the Open University as a hobby. In recent years he has become increasingly interested in early Christianity and its impact on scientific progress down to the present day.

7.30pm to 9.00pm, in the Denham Room, Priory Street Centre, York YO1 6ET.

Tues 1 October 2019

Clinical Trials with Marc Taylor.

7.30pm to 9.00pm, in the Denham Room, Priory Street Centre, York YO1 6ET.

Tues 3 December 2019

TBA.

7.30pm to 9.00pm, in the Denham Room, Priory Street Centre, York YO1 6ET.

Tues 7 January 2020

The New Working Class: How to win hearts, minds and votes with Claire Ainsley.

7.30pm to 9.00pm, in the Denham Room, Priory Street Centre, York YO1 6ET.

Click to go to the Humanists UK web site

To contact us, email us at info@nyhg.org.uk